Is Garlic Bad For Dogs?

The answer to the question “can dogs have garlic” is simple: no, no, and no!

Simply put, garlic ranks high up on the list of foods that dogs should not eat, ever, as it’s definitely bad for them.

While it may seem like garlic would be fine for dogs since it’s a vegetable, and many people mistakenly assume that all vegetables must be good for dogs, this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

In fact, even in small quantities, garlic has been known to cause severe negative reactions in dogs, including anemia, diarrhea, vomiting, or even death.

Additionally, many popular garlic seasonings, like garlic salt, garlic powder, and minced garlic are also considered toxic to dogs, so it’s best to avoid these at all costs as well.

If your dog has consumed garlic (or even if you only suspect your dog of consuming garlic), please seek medical assistance from your veterinarian or a nearby emergency animal clinic as soon as possible.

Why is Garlic Poisonous to Dogs?

Dogs and garlic simply don’t mix.

Garlic and other members of the allium family (e.g., onions, chives, leeks, shallots, and scallions) contain a substance known as thiosulfate, which is toxic to dogs but not to humans.

What Happens If A Dog Eats Garlic?

When dogs eat garlic and other foods containing thiosulfates, they can develop hemolytic anemia—a disorder in which red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be replenished. This substance also puts dogs at risk for developing other serious conditions like Heinz body anemia and methemoglobinemia.

These disorders can cause several serious side effects, including rapid breathing, lethargy, weakness, jaundice, and dark-colored urine.

A full list of symptoms can be found below:

Symptoms of Garlic Poisoning in Dogs

  • Abdominal tenderness and cramping
  • Anemia
  • Anorexia
  • Bad Breath
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Dehydration
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Liver and spleen inflammation
  • Nausea
  • Pale gums
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Yellow skin and eyes
  • Muscle weakness

What to Do If Your Dog Eats Garlic

If your dog has eaten any amount of garlic, your best bet is to take him or her to a veterinarian or emergency animal clinic.

Depending on symptom severity, your dog may need intravenous fluids or medication to control vomiting.

In severe cases, your dog may even need a blood transfusion to help mend the red blood cell damage caused by thiosulfate.

Frequently Asked Questions About Dogs & Garlic

For more information regarding dogs eating garlic, please refer to the F.A.Q listed below.

Remember, if you suspect your dog has eaten garlic, it’s important to seek medical attention as soon as possible, so please stop reading this post and call the vet immediately.

Is Garlic Seasoning Bad For Dogs?

Garlic seasonings (e.g., minced garlic, garlic powder, garlic salt, etc.) are a common cause of garlic poisoning in dogs.

Therefore, it’s critically important for dog owners to stow garlic and any other members of the allium family in a safe and secure location.

It’s also important to keep a watchful eye entertaining guests or attending family picnics because some individuals (especially children) may be tempted to give your dog a slice of garlic bread or a fork full of spaghetti as a treat without knowing the harm they could be causing.

Please make sure to take this threat to your dog’s health seriously, as garlic can do a lot of damage, and the best way to prevent that is to simply avoid letting your dog get access to it.

How Much Garlic Is Safe For A Dog?

According to studies, it takes 15-30 grams of garlic per kilogram of body weight to produce negative symptoms in dogs. [i]

To put this amount in perspective, a single clove of garlic weighs between 3-7 grams, meaning your dog would have to consume a large amount of garlic before he or she starts to suffer from garlic poisoning.

However, just like humans have food allergies, some dogs can be more sensitive to garlic than others, which is why no amount of garlic should be considered safe for dogs.

Is Garlic Good For Fleas?

Garlic is believed to be a natural flea repellant due to its ability to change the taste and smell of a dog’s skin, which is why some dog nutrition “experts” may recommend garlic for dogs.

However, even if this was true, garlic carries too many risks to be considered a safe and effective treatment for fleas.

If your dog has fleas, there are several safe and veterinarian-approved treatments available, all of which are likely to be far safer, and more effective, than feeding garlic.

Is Garlic Good For Dogs?

Unfortunately, the same so-called “experts” who believe that garlic can repel fleas also believe garlic, in small dosages, can improve the health and well-being of your furry best friend.

But once again, we want to make it clear that feeding your dog garlic is simply not worth the risk.

Even if your dog doesn’t appear to be suffering from any negative symptoms associated with garlic poisoning, they may still be suffering from mild symptoms like an upset stomach and indigestion, and the risks far outweigh any potential rewards.

Safe Treats for Your Dog

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Hip to Be Square Chicken & Pumpkin Dog Treats

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Treat Your Dog With Lucy Pet!

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